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The Warmest Heart Attack: An Interview with Gameface

We chat to Jeff Caudill, frontman for recently reformed punk rock favorites Gameface.

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Vocalist and songwriter Jeff Caudill has spent a great deal of his life writing and recording songs with his band Gameface. They started making a name for themselves with their melody-charged, pop-tinged punk debut Good (1993), before going on to record albums for Revelation Records through the late 1990s and early 2000s.

Unafraid of fusing punk urgency with catchy choruses and heartfelt content, the band proved to be the perfect crossroads between punk, hardcore and the original formation of emo. In 2003, after the release of their Doghouse album Four To Go, the band members went their separate ways but never kept too far away from music.

In 2012, the band reformed to play selected shows and not long after, signed to Equal Vision Records. Now on the doorstep of their first recorded material in years, a new 7”, and a decade removed from their last album, Southern California’s Gameface are back doing what they love most.

You recently said that getting back together as a very natural process, did you all want the same things when you first go back together? Does this feel like the next chapter or starting over?

Jeff Caudill: Yeah, it was natural in that it took a long time to actually happen. It took the last few years to really understand the reasons we gave it up in 2003. We had to put all that to rest before we could pick up our instruments and really move forward. Now we’re all back on the same page and we all have the same expectations. That’s important because that was one thing that destroyed us before. We’re very fortunate to even have this opportunity at all so our only real goal is to make great music again. This band means a lot to us. It’s really a gift to have it back in our lives.

During Gameface’s hiatus, what kept you all busy? Jeff, I know you’ve been writing and performing as a solo artist and in Your Favorite Trainwreck, does this mean those projects are on hold?

Yeah, I never stop. For better or for worse I just can’t stop making music. I’m proud of all that I have done with my solo projects and the YFT album…but Gameface is different for me. Gameface is my guts. I know the other guys feel the same. They’ve done other bands and whatnot but there’s just something about Gameface that couldn’t be replicated with anyone else.

Gameface is my guts. I know the other guys feel the same.  

– Jeff Caudill

Equal Vision is a great fit, what was the reasons for signing with EVR? And were Revelation interested in doing new Gameface material?

EVR was at the top of our list from the beginning. They come from the same place in the scene that we do. Their label has found a way to grow and stay relevant and maintain itself for over 20 years and that’s impressive. The label roster is really diverse and the staff is great. We’re really fortunate that they believe in our band like we do.

It’s been a decade since we’ve had Gameface music, are the reasons why you write songs now still the same as back then?

Yeah. That never changes. I write about my life, as a way to deal with things and share and express myself. I write about myself but for others – hoping to connect with people that feel the same things and need an outlet.

Your new song, “Come On Down”, has some personal and important meaning behind it. Did this become the catalyst for the rest of the new material, the creative spark so to speak?

Yeah. I wasn’t sure Gameface was going to write any new material. I figured we’d do some reunion shows, play the “hits” and that would be it. But that song changed everything. An avalanche of new songs followed after that one. It was that Gameface feeling all over again.

Listen to Gameface’s new song “Come On Down”:

What are the plans for the next few months, is it all new album or will you be out on the road?

Just recording the album and making sure it’s as great as we think it is. We’ll start playing in 2014.

Have you guys ever been to Australia?

We haven’t but would absolutely love to go someday. If you’re offering, we’re already packing ; )

Looking back at your discography, are there particular songs or albums you’re still most fond of?

There’s a decent list of songs that I feel are the standouts in our catalog. The ones I like most may not be the ones you do but I think there are some obvious ones… “My Star”, “Only Souvenir”, “Laughable”, “Gibberish”, “Mean”, “Friday Matinee”, “Only Chance We Get”, “The Pirate Song”, “Chasing The Sun”, “How Far is Goodbye?”…

This question is a little self indulgent on my part, but the song “How Far Is Goodbye?” has always been a favourite. Do you remember why you wrote this song or whether this was about a particular person or place?

Yeah, as I was saying a lot of the songs are pretty autobiographical and that one is no exception. The song is generally knowing when it’s time to move on from a group of friends that you are obviously not happy being around. I drew references from a few times in my life where I was living somewhere and with people that were ultimately holding me down. I don’t like to be very specific when I talk about my lyrics mostly because I don’t want to ruin anyone else’s interpretation of them. Sometimes their vision of what the song says is way more interesting than mine. But when we get to Australia I’ll tell you all the details about this one.

Gameface’s new 7″, Come On Down, is available from Equal Vision Records starting November 5th. A new album is due in 2014. Photo by Kip Terry

Bonus track: “How Far Is Goodbye?”


Interviews

Neon Love: Introducing Okay Cool

We talk to LA duo Okay Cool about their debut single

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On the fourth or fifth time I listened to Okay Cool’s first single “Back To You” I hear a voice from the other room chiming in, “this song is really great my love”. It’s my wife, who often spends moments in the other room passively listening to my music. Okay Cool, the suave duo comprised of Jenna Maranga and Rich Gonzalez are on the cusp of releasing their first single and amongst the myriad of music my wife listens to second hand, this is the one she comments on.

It’s only been two years since Okay Cool formed. Once separated by the continental United States, both Maranga and Gonzalez call the City of Angels home. And it’s “home” home. Maranga, who has spent time in New York, has returned to the city she grew up in, reuniting with her friend that spent many summer days at her parent’s house (the same one they still live in now), by the pool drinking margaritas.

I imagine the formation of Okay Cool as happening under the Los Angeles’ night sky, summer some time, clad in the aura of neon lights. But the truth is, their formation happened much more organically, as Maranga explains; “[Rich] has a really cozy studio in his house in Crenshaw that you just want to spend time in, sipping bourbon and hanging out with Billy the pup. Though we didn’t go into it expecting anything like Okay Cool to be born, we genuinely loved the songs we were writing. We were both feeling giddy about the sound we were moving toward and the relaxed vibe — it was like we were making a soundtrack to our time together”. And as you listen to “Back To You”, you get that — a certain vibe, the soundtrack of two artists making music over bourbon and hanging out with Billy the pup. But as the listens multiply, you know that it’s also much more. Clad in the silky smooth vibes of R&B and soul made famous by artists like Sade, Okay Cool channel the timeless sounds of sophisticated pop that resonates on a multitude of levels.

Sade was an escapable name in the 80s, one that crossed the globe. But when asked if Okay Cool purposely set out to make music like Sade, the answer may surprise you; “For me, this sound is just kind of what naturally comes out when I produce music. Jenna’s project Isla June is quite different from our sound for Okay Cool, which is the best part of this project in my opinion. Jenna has a unique ability of shaping her voice/writing style to most genres. I’d like to think Jenna brings out the best in my production style.” Gonzales says. But flip that on the upside and you have Maranga’s differing approach; “That’s why I need Rich! It totally comes naturally to him. I’ll be honest, for me, it was more or less intentional. Most of the music I’ve written over the years has been loud and energetic with a lot of belting vocals and sonic builds. I wanted to do something totally different in the realm of Sade (whom I love), and Rich is the perfect counterpart for that. His writing and production are some of my favorites to sing melodies to — they immediately spark ideas, and his jazz background has given him an innate sense for structure and arrangement. His songs just flow so well.” Combine the two approaches and you have Okay Cool’s debut single- classy production that crosses soul and jazz with electronica and a golden voice that melts.

They seem to work in concert because even though they approach Okay Cool a little differently, the collaboration works. And whether you listen to “Back To You” to find comfort in the night sky after a long day, or find it as the perfect soundtrack on a weekend drive’s winding roads, the song’s gradual build and composed crescendo is the refined kind of cool.

“Back to You” was one of those songs that just fell into place. The song is a bit of a love letter to mother nature, and a subtle plea to give her back what she deserves

– Jenna maranga, okay cool

Gonzalez found inspiration for his music from some historical greats, and his production sizzles with the kind of refinement his influences are known for; “Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Sonny Rollins, Count Basie among other jazz classics. I also listened to a lot of classical music like Percy Grainger, Chopin” he says. His influences ultimately helped shape Okay Cool, and as Maranga states, they aim to pave a new path for the genre while paying artistic homage at the same time; “I have been a fan of Stax and Motown soul forever, and as a 90s kid I grew up with an iteration of R&B that was impossible not to love. The more I learn about the history of both genres, the deeper my appreciation and respect for it grows. I’m glad we can give a little nod to it in our own music.”

“Back To You” is only the first step for Okay Cool, the initial foray that will be followed by more singles and an EP. But when pressed about a possible full-length album, there is no doubt one is on the way. Yet as you talk to both Maranga and Gonzales about Okay Cool you realise that they both approach the project with both a seriousness to creating art and music, but at the same time, realizing that the journey of creating it, can come with a lightheartedness and a joie de vivre that makes it all worth it in the end; “we’re having a good time inventing the brand around Okay Cool and cultivating a vibe that’s fun and not taking ourselves too seriously.”

Listen to “Back To You” and you’ll feel the same — art and music that sounds timeless, like those artists that came before them. But it is also full of life and pulls you into the present moment, making you smile. Whether it grabs you on the first listen, or it hypnotizes you on the fourth or fifth listen, “Back To You” leaves you eager to hear more. And what else could you want from your first single?

Listen to “Back To You”

Okay Cool’s new single “Back To You” will be available July 10th on all streaming services. You can find more Okay Cool on their website, Instagram, and Soundcloud.

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Interviews

A New Tomorrow: An interview with Lee Resistant & The Lost

Lee Resistant & The Lost find life in old songs and a path to a new tomorrow

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Sometimes you have to look into the past to find the future. It is a sentiment that UK transplant Lee Resistant understands quite well. Once a member of UK punk band Fletcher, Lee has found new life in old songs, revisiting material he wrote for his previous bands while giving them a new sheen for current times. With a solo career established, Lee Resistant formed his latest outfit, Lee Resistant & The Lost, during the close of 2017. He found that some of his old material not only held up over time, but still had much to give in way of connecting with new listeners.

Now with two EPs under their belts, Lee Resistant & The Lost are finding that sometimes looking back into your past is a great way to move forward. Their latest EP, Thirteen Years Gone By…, features reworked and re-recorded songs from Lee’s previous efforts, songs that are part of the catalyst that propels the band towards all new material on the horizon.

We spoke to Lee Resistant not long after the release of their new EP and talked the past, the present, and the future.

The EP has been out for a little bit now- you’ve been getting a good response to it- how does it feel?

It feels really good, the reaction we’ve had to it so far has been very positive. The songs themselves had a good reaction when they were originally released back in the day, so the issue for me was releasing re-recorded versions that I felt had to be better than the originals, otherwise what would be the point?

The lead track “Least Resistant” is a rework of a Fletcher track from back in 2003- are the other songs on the EP as well or were they songs you had written outside of the band?

“Least Resistant” and “Where Would You Run?” are from the 2003 Fletcher full-length My Revenge, and “Wishlist” is from the 2002 Six Track Sound EP. “For The Few” is a song I wrote for the band I started after coming to Canada, RUCKS, which was active from 2007-2009. Brian (bass) and Alex (drums) from LRATL were in that band too, so we have a long history of playing together now.

Share with us a little of your reasons why you’re looking at some of these songs you wrote and giving them a revisit and re-recording.

I’ve been concentrating on playing solo acoustic shows for the last few years but, really, I’ve always been a ‘band’ guy, so when I decided I wanted to end 2018 with a full band show it was a chance to dust off a few of my favorite songs from the back catalog, several of which I never actually sang back in those days! It was exciting because I genuinely never thought I’d get to play those songs in a band situation again, and I think they’re great songs that stand the test of time.

With regard to recording them, I’d been writing for a LRATL full-length, and the collection of songs I have for it feel like a more solid piece of work together, so I didn’t really want to cull a separate EP from it. Revisiting some of the older material seemed like a perfect way to bridge the gap between my musical past to where I’m at now, and also break the guys into my production process with a little less pressure! [laughs]

Thirteen Years Gone By…

Tell us a little bit about your history with Fletcher- you guys were together from a few years from 2000-2005?

That’s right. We were signed to Deck Cheese Records in the UK at the tail end of 2001 and Pyropit Records in Japan in either late 2003 or early 2004. We got to do a lot of cool stuff and played with most of my favorite bands… I have really good memories of those days, and it felt like we were on the cusp of doing so much more when things pretty much fell apart. We were touring as much as we could while holding down full-time jobs at the same time, and things were basically at the point where the next opportunity on the table would have involved quitting our jobs and going on the road for three and a half months across North America and, from my viewpoint at least, that seemed like too much of a chance to take for the other guys.

Did it end on good terms?

For me, no it didn’t. I don’t know if it’s because I’m stubborn or a complete asshole, but Fletcher played our last show together on July 17th, 2005 and I walked out of the venue afterwards and didn’t talk to any of the others for ten years. For me, playing music has never been about being famous, or getting rich, or any of that bullshit, but I think the disappointment of seeing what we could have done together collapse was really hard to take at that particular time.

You’re originally from the UK- what prompted the move to Canada?

Hahaha, let’s just say MySpace has a lot to answer for, and leave it at that!!

How did Lee Resistant & The Lost get started?

LRATL actually started as a solo recording project at the end of 2017. I was writing songs that I was hearing in my head as ‘full band’ productions more than strictly acoustic material, so my aim was to put out a song on the first of every month for the whole of 2018. That was a pretty ambitious schedule at that time, so it ended up being a five-song EP called 42/43. I have the word LOST tattooed on the knuckles of my right hand, so I called the project Lee Resistant & The Lost, as it was basically me and my right hand doing everything! [laughs]

Putting the band together with Jakob, Brian and Alex for that 2018 show was a bit of a revelation, and I was like “this feels REALLY good!”, and it’s progressed from there.

So my favorite track on the new EP is “For the Few”- how did that song come together?

I think “For The Few” was written in late ’07/ early ’08. We were doing shows at the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 28 in Chatham, Ontario, and there was a mural thing on the back wall with the Laurence Binyon poem ‘For The Fallen’ on it. That World War One poetry has always resonated with me for some reason, so it got me thinking about people of all walks of life who have laid down their lives or sacrificed everything they have, for something they believe in. I think there is no more honor in life than that, so “For The Few” is my humble tribute to them.

I really enjoyed the EP- but it’s not the most recent music you’ve released- as a solo artist, you co-released an EP with Curt Murder. How did that collaboration come about?

Yeah, I kinda screwed up my scheduling and both records were out within a week of each other! Curt and I have been buddies for a while and we’d been planning to do a split since August of last year, so once we figured out when we could get together I recorded it at my home studio in Chatham. Curt runs Reel Too Real Records, which is a DIY, cassette-based, limited run deal, so we released it via that and digital. The record is called Split The Difference, basically because we look like brothers! Haha

The song on there- “Over and Out”- it’s brilliant- evoking, haunting. Do you approach songwriting as a solo artist different to when you write for The Lost?

Thank you, I appreciate that! My approach to songwriting tends to stay the same… I’m not one of those people that records or writes down every single idea I ever have in the hopes of making something out of them. To me, that’s a recipe for utter crap! [laughs]

If  ideas come to me I will keep them in my head, and if they’re good then I will remember them. Some songs come together pretty quickly, but others will make themselves known to me when the time is right. It’s a pretty fluid process for me, and I feel like more of a conduit than a ‘composer’ most of the time. I never force a song just for the sake of getting it done, I still have unfinished songs from 2011 or so kicking around in my skull.. they’ll let me know when they’re ready!

You’re currently working on new material for Lee Resistant & The Lost- how have these currently reworked songs helped shape the material and the direction for the new music?

It’s more like the new material helped shape the reworking of the old songs… I feel a bit more capable as a writer and arranger these days, and I find I ‘hear’ a lot more layers within songs but also have more of an ability to manifest those ideas too.

When are you hoping to have the new album done by?

The current plan is to have the full-length finished by the fall, and hopefully find a label willing to put it out early next year. We’re going to do a standalone single release in early September to keep things ticking over, and a video for ‘Where Would You Run?’ from ‘Thirteen Years Gone By…’ is in production at the moment. I’m also figuring out my next acoustic record, and I do everything DIY so there’s plenty to keep me busy! [laughs]

Lee Resistant & The Lost’s new EP, Thirteen Years Gone By…, is out now. Stream and purchase via Bandcamp. Photo by: Chris Forrest at Synicalist Photography.

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